Looney Tunes – Just Mooning!

The lunatic is on the grass
The lunatic is on the grass
Remembering games and daisy chains and laughs
Got to keep the loonies on the path
The lunatic is in the hall
The lunatics are in my hall
The paper holds their folded faces to the floor
And every day the paper boy brings more
And if the dam breaks open many years too soon
And if there is no room upon the hill
And if your head explodes with dark forbodings too
I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon
The lunatic is in my head
The lunatic is in my head
You raise the blade, you make the change
You re-arrange me ’till I’m sane
You lock the door
And throw away the key
There’s someone in my head but it’s not me.
And if the cloud bursts, thunder in your ear
You shout and no one seems to hear
And if the band you’re in starts playing different tunes
I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon

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Dogs, Doggy-style & Mad Dogs and Englishmen

DOGS

You gotta hand it to that indie rock band OK-GO. I’d earlier placed two of their videos – the amazingly innovative one with an elaborate arrangement of dominoes & the one known as the ‘Treadmill song.’ They’re in this post: https://gipsygeek.wordpress.com/2010/04/12/this-too-shall-pass/

OK-GO’s videos are made with no computer effects and shot in one take. And their latest one released three days ago is a real heart-warmer.  They took almost 100 takes of the sequence and the one released for the video is the 72nd take.

Since writing my last post, and since the time I’d seen the videos of the truth behind fur (Saltationism of Silliness), I’d been saddened and horrified for days and nights on end. Somewhere, the repulsion at that injustice still stays within. How can people who endorse and work for fur be so cruel?  So watching this video this week was truly heart-warming. And a much needed laugh. Dogs – those devoted, trusting brown-eyed givers of unconditional love.  Take a gander. Or rather, a sniff and a woof:

*woof*

DOGGY-STYLE

I must have been buried in some nerdy bookworld to have missed the following vid. It was released as some much-needed heat in the snowy winter early this year. When you start a blog, you can see in your dashboard search terms people use. And in the initial months, I’d get a few searches ‘Shakira Gypsy’ that had led a few to my blog. (Luckily ‘gipsy geek’  remains a top search word, since this blog has a steady readership now, and has been passed around.) I only decided last week to check what people were looking for when they typed the ‘Shakira Gypsy’ phrase (yeah, I’m glacially slow in checking certain things) and santa calor!! who would have guessed?! The world No. 1 tennis champ getting sweaty with the seductive curves of lady Shakira!

That man who plays in those long goofy bermuda shorts in this surprisingly sexy-though-cute persona! Goes to show how there are so many sides to multifarious people but our perception of their image can often get pigeonholed to the one that is primarily seen. We’re often seeing his rival Federer advertising for apparel and razors,  but have to admit this video certainly beats Roger and many other sportsmen – in its shirtlessness and sharpness and the on-screen chemistry of the duo. You wish you didn’t have to always associate ‘Spanish’ with ‘fiery’ and ‘passionate’ (Nadal of course is Spanish and Shakira a Spanish-Lebanese mix) but darn – this song sure shows a side of Nadal which, after watching, the image of that focused dorkiness he displays on the tennis court is forever shattered. It’s always the quiet shy ones ;-)  Not to mention Shakira’s signature shakes of vocals and ….er, of her round radiant rear. Muy caliente!

Here’s more on the making of Gypsy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_%28Shakira_song%29 About the title, her explanation was:

“(The song represents my) way of living and seeing life. I’ve been on the road since I was very young, so that’s where the gypsy metaphor comes from.”  (Also) “Gypsies are travelers of life, always absorbed in different cultures and learning from them”.

*woof, woof, wowza, ruff!*

MAD DOGS & ENGLISHMEN

Mad dogs and Englishmen may go out in the midday sun, but my favourite rock band would rather venture out in the dark side of the moon. If the above two videos were not so much for the music itself but only for the imagination of choreography with dancing dogs, and the second for the out-of-usual-context presence and pleasant shock of seeing the Tennis world’s No. 1 player doggy-styling artistically choreographed poses, this one is mainly for its timeless music and lyrics. One of my all time top favourite songs that I can hear over and over and over again. From the group whose quality and innovation has been as consistent and staunch as the proverbial metaphor of the English bulldog.

Time. Turbulent. Tenacious. Timeless.



Breathe, breathe in the air
Don’t be afraid to care
Leave, but don’t leave me
Look around
Choose your own ground

Long you live and high you fly
And smiles you’ll give and tears you’ll cry
And all you touch and all you see
Is all your life will ever be…..

Run, rabbit run
Dig that hole, forget the sun
And when at last the work is done
Don’t sit down
It’s time to dig another one.

(excerpt from Pink Floyd ‘Breathe’ Album Dark Side of the Moon)

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The timeless giver of unconditional love : D-O-G

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Empty Spaces

COMFORTABLY NUMB IN EMPTY SPACES: I have watched the movie ‘the Wall’ seven times in the past 12 years and it always remains haunting. Questioning. And always powerful. And while it outlined excerpts from the band members’ lives, parts of it are said to show Syd Barrett’s fall into schizophrenia. But this excerpt from the movie in the first video posted below is one of the most powerful animations I had seen on film when I’d first viewed it years back. And still remains to this day. (The flower is symbolic, as any man who has had his heart ripped would know.) As dark and symbolic as the whole movie is about a man’s existential crises,  as he isolates himself from the apathy and chaos of the ‘usual’ ways of thinking around him, at least by the end of the film it ends on an ambiguous but positive note when he finally breaks free from the wall that he had made around himself one brick at a time.

The metaphorical film released in 1982 is rich in graphic, often disturbing imagery, music and symbolism and punctuated by animated sequences by political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe. It was directed by Alan Parker and the screenplay written by Pink Floyd vocalist and bassist Roger Waters. Waters in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine had discussed that the album as well as the film were both derived partially from Jean-Paul Sartre’s story by the same name, which according to Waters had deeply moved him and changed the way he viewed life.

Pink Floyd’s music was always reflective. Contemplative. Haunting. I had first heard its sounds when my mother had used parts of the soundtrack from the Dark Side of the Moon album for a play she was directing. I was too young to understand much of what their lyrics or music signified at that age but later in architecture school (where they were madly popular) I began a very serious appreciation of both the creativity and departure-from-norm that their work had encompassed, away from the ‘pretty’ and lovey-dovey boy-bands that had won more hearts in the 60s and 70s. Pink Floyd instead was cerebral, intellectual, questioning – it tackled pondering and pain, not fluffy teenage fluttering hearts. I was blown away by their depth and imagery and music. The band had formed in London’s architecture school and its initial goofy name was ‘The Architectural Abdabs.’
Today I am finishing a book I had received sometime back:
Pink Floyd & Philosophy: Careful with the Axiom, Eugene. Edited by George A. Reisch – professor of philosophy at the Northwestern University. An excerpt from the book’s back cover:

“What does the power of great art have to do with madness? Should psychedelic drugs make us doubt the evidence of our senses? How did power, sadism, and conformity turn education into mind control (not that we need either)? Can a rock band keep its identity as its members change? What can we learn from the synchronicities between The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wizard of Oz? Did Friedrich Nietzsche foreshadow Syd Barrett? When did you realize that you are the hole in reality? How can you have any pudding if you don’t eat yer meat?

The existential, cinematic music of Pink Floyd made them one of the most influential and recognizable rock bands of all time. They didn’t do it by leaving their audiences comfortably numb, but by unsettling, disturbing, questioning, and criticizing.”

As I write this, it is one of those nights when from the sour warm depths of a spring evening, melancholy takes over; and after a while soaking in its darkness and stilling those questions, one begins to feel uncomfortably numb………

(Warning: Both videos have graphic content. And are very dark. Not for the faint-hearted. To be watched only during melancholic moods. And at night. Do not ruin your mornings by watching these….)

V

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For one of those nights when the shadows and voices of life and existence cannot remain still any longer – the movie The Wall is available here  (in parts) :